Spotify’s scary new privacy policy gives you another reason to switch to Apple Music

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Spotify’s scary new privacy policy gives you another reason to switch to Apple Music

If you haven’t already swapped Spotify for Apple Music, then the company’s scary new privacy policy should convince you to do so. With its latest updates, the company warns it may collect your contacts, photos, and other media, and even keep an eye on your location data.

Spotify’s new privacy policy went into effect on August 19, and it’s recommended that you read it all — but be warned: it’s 13 pages long and gets pretty exhaustive. Thankfully, Wired has picked out some of the most concerning sections so that we can be aware of Spotify’s worrying new terms.

“With your permission, we may collect information stored on your mobile device, such as contacts, photos, or media files,” reads one section. It’s unclear why Spotify needs to collect our contacts, let alone private photos and media files, but it may do it anyway.

Spotify adds, “Local law may require that you seek the consent of your contacts to provide their personal information to Spotify, which may use that information for the purposes specified in this Privacy Policy.” So before you accept the new policy, you’re going to need to call all your friends and ask them if it’s okay to share their information with Spotify.

The company also wants to collect your location data — not only from your phone’s GPS, but also from “other forms of locating mobile devices,” such as Bluetooth. “We may also collect sensor data (e.g., data about the speed of your movements, such as whether you are running, walking, or in transit),” it adds.

Read Also:  Apple Music will stream at 256kbps, just like iTunes Match

Spotify may collect even more data if you integrate your Spotify account with third-party apps and services. So if you connect Spotify to your Facebook account, for example, the company may decide to collect your “likes” and social updates.

This kind of data could help the company improve the service it provides you; if you write about your favorite bands and artists on Facebook, or “like” posts from those bands and artists, then this data could help improve the recommendations that Spotify provides you with.

But I still don’t understand why the company wants our photos and other media, or data about where we’re going and how fast we’re traveling to get there.

If you’re unhappy with any of these terms, and don’t wish to agree to Spotify’s new policy, “then please don’t use the Service,” the company says.

Wired recommends that if you do plan to continue using Spotify, head into your account settings where you can opt-out of receiving Spotify new by email and SMS, and having your data shared with third parties. At least if you do this, the photos and other private data Spotify might collect won’t be passed on.

[Source: iPhoneHacks]
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